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December 4
CO2 emissions rises mean dangerous climate change now almost certain Research by the Global Carbon Project says emissions growth placing world on path to warm between 4 and 6C. Carbon dioxide emissions from industry rose an estimated 2.6% this year, according to a study of global carbon emissions. The research by the Global Carbon Project, an annual report card on mankind's CO2 pollution, also says emissions grew 3.1% in 2011, placing the world on a near-certain path towards dangerous climate change, such as more heat waves, droughts and storms. (from the Guardian)

November 16
In recent days, the Netherlands’ peerless expertise and centuries of experience in battling water have been widely hailed in the United States as offering lessons for how New York and other cities might better protect people and property from flooding. But Dutch officials and hydrology experts who have examined the contrasting systems of the two countries say that replicating Dutch successes in the United States would require a radical reshaping of the American approach to vulnerable coastal areas and disaster prevention. (from the New York Times)

November 15
The changing climate of the Earth has become so politicized, both presidential candidates avoided it during the U.S. election campaign. But  U.S. President Obama did say, "We want our children to live in an America ... that isn't threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet." Will he follow through, and will Canada follow his lead? (from the CBC, posted Nov 9)

November 12
Hurricane Sandy caused more than $50 billion in damage in the New York region, according to NY State officials, making it the country’s costliest storm other than Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast region in 2005. That hurricane caused about $145 billion in damages, with the federal government providing about $110 billion in disaster aid, according to NY State Cuomo's officials. (from the New York Times)

November 12
Miltary risks. Climate change is accelerating, and it will place unparalleled strains on American military and intelligence agencies in coming years by causing ever more disruptive events around the globe, the US’s top scientific research group said in a report issued Friday.  (from the New York Times)

November 12
The mystery of the expansion of sea ice around Antarctica, at the same time as global warming is melting swaths of Arctic sea ice, has been solved using data from US military satellites. Two decades of measurements show that changing wind patterns around Antarctica have caused a small increase in sea ice, the result of cold winds off the continent blowing ice away from the coastline. (from the Guardian)

Click here for recent Guardian articles on climate change.

November 12
The heads of major UK companies joined calls on Monday for the government to bring in a target to slash emissions from the power sector by 2030. (from the Guardian)

November 10
Climate change is likely to be more severe than some models have implied, according to a new study which ratchets up the possible temperature rises and subsequent climatic impacts. (from the Guardian)

November 7
For more than a century, for good or ill, New Jersey has led the U.S. in coastal development. Many of the barrier islands along its coast have long been lined by rock jetties, concrete sea walls or other protective armor. Most of its coastal communities have beaches only because engineers periodically replenish them with sand pumped from offshore. (from the New York Times)

October 31
Some individual parts of Sandy and its wrath seem to be influenced by climate change, several climate scientists said. First, there's sea level rise. Water levels around New York are a nearly a foot (0.3 metres) higher than they were 100 years ago, said Penn State University climate scientist Michael Mann. (from the CBC).

October 29
In recent weeks a slew of stories has hit the news about the soaring price of food, petrol and household energy – and the financial pressure this is putting on cash-strapped households. But as decision-makers scrabble  for the best short-term fix, a fundamental cause underpinning much of these economic woes is often overlooked. (from the Guardian)

October 29
The two UN agencies for health and weather services have created a new "atlas" of scientific data that they say offers fresh evidence of the links between climate change to outbreaks of meningitis, malaria and other diseases. (from the CBC)

October 15
If extreme weather becomes the norm, starvation awaits With forecasts currently based only on averages, food production may splutter out even sooner than we feared. (George Monbiot, in the Guardian)
October 3
Canadian and U.S. scientists are predicting 2012 will set records for warm ocean temperatures on the eastern Seaboard. Research at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, shows that temperatures off Nova Scotia in August were about two degrees above normal. (from the CBC)

September 24
As icebergs in the Kayak Harbor pop and hiss while melting away, Narsaq, a remote Arctic town, and its culture are also disappearing in a changing climate. Narsaq’s largest employer, a shrimp factory, closed a few years ago after the crustaceans fled north to cooler water. Where once there were eight commercial fishing vessels, there is now one. (from the New York Times)

September 20
It has been a summer full of reports of extreme weather, of unparalleled scope and severity. Among the highlights: one of the warmest years on record in the US, record-high temperatures in central and eastern Europe, the wettest summer in the UK, the heaviest rainfalls in northern India and the Philippines and the most severe droughts in the US and east Africa.

In short, climate change and weather extremes are not about a distant future. Formerly one-off extreme weather episodes seem to be becoming the new normal. Weather extremes are not that extreme any more. Heatwaves, floods, droughts and wildfires are the new reality of an ever warming world. (from the Guardian)

September 19
Climate change threatens to wreak havoc on entire marine ecosystems due to factors such as rising water temperatures, increased acidification, and reduced oxygen levels, according to a report on B.C.’s Pacific coast. (from the Vancouver Sun)

September 19

Food is one of society's key sensitivities to climate. A year of not enough or too much rainfall, a hot spell or cold snap at the wrong time, or extremes, like flooding and storms, can have a significant effect on local crop yields and livestock production. While modern farming technologies and techniques have helped to reduce this vulnerability and boost production, the impact of recent droughts in the US, China and Russia on global cereal production highlight a glaring potential future vulnerability. (from the Guardian)

September 19
Arctic ice cover has reached another nadir, melting to its least coverage in recent history, according to scientists from the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Centre. (from the CBC)

September 8
The loss of Arctic ice is massively compounding the effects of greenhouse gas emissions, ice scientist Professor Peter Wadhams has told BBC Newsnight. White ice reflects more sunlight than open water, acting like a parasol.

Melting of white Arctic ice, currently at its lowest level in recent history, is causing more absorption. Prof Wadhams calculates this absorption of the sun's rays is having an effect "the equivalent of about 20 years of additional CO2 being added by man". The Cambridge University expert says that the Arctic ice cap is "heading for oblivion". (from the BBC)

NSIDC sea ice extent map

The sea ice extent at 26 August (white) is markedly different from the 1979-2000 average (orange line) (from the BBC)
September 7
Scientists in the Arctic are warning that this summer's record-breaking melt is part of an accelerating trend with profound implications. Norwegian researchers report that the sea ice is becoming significantly thinner and more vulnerable.

Last month, the annual thaw of the region's floating ice reached the lowest level since satellite monitoring began, more than 30 years ago. It is thought the scale of the decline may even affect Europe's weather. The melt is set to continue for at least another week - the peak is usually reached in mid-September - while temperatures here remain above freezing. (from the BBC)

June 16
It is tempting to be cynical about events such as next week’s Rio+20 summit on sustainable development. Unfortunately, many of the participating governments offer us ample ammunition. But far too much is at stake in these discussions to allow ourselves the luxury of cynicism. (from the Irish Times)

June 16
British Columbia and Ontario score highest in environmental stewardship, according to a national report card published by a Canadian business magazine. (from the CBC)

May 26
Fuelled by historic drought conditions, wildfires raced across a dry and windy south-west on Friday, destroying dozens of homes and depositing a smoky haze over the city of Albuquerque, New Mexico. (from the Guardian)

May 25
The latest round of international climate change talks finished on Friday in discord and disappointment, with some participants concerned that important progress made last year was being unpicked. (from the Guardian)

May 25
The brown argus butterfly in England has spread northward as the warmer climate allows its caterpillars to feed off a new host plant, wild geraniums, researchers say. (from the New York Times)

May 24
Some of Greenland's glaciers are moving about 30 percent faster than they did 10 years ago, contributing to rising global sea levels, but that still may not be enough to reach the most extreme projections for 2100, scientists reported on Thursday. (from the Vancouver Sun)

May 24
Environment chiefs consider redefining droughts after record rainfall For more than a month the public have been left baffled after being told that swathes of Britain are in drought despite record levels of rain and flash floods. (from the Telegraph)

May 23
When free markets do not maximise society's welfare, they are said to 'fail' and policy intervention may be needed to correct them. Many economists have described climate change as an example of a market failure – though in fact a number of distinct market failures have been identified. (from the Guardian)

May 1
New research suggests that global warming is causing the cycle of evaporation and rainfall over the oceans to intensify more than scientists had expected, an ominous finding that may indicate a higher potential for extreme weather in coming decades. (from the New York Times)

April 30
Federal and provincial parks and other conservation areas provide animals, birds and plants with the best chance of weathering rapid climate change, says an Ontario scholar and parks researcher. (from the Sun Times)

April 26
Researchers have found that climate change is likely to have far greater influence on the volatility of corn prices over the next three decades than factors that recently have been blamed for price swings — like oil prices, trade policies and government biofuel mandates.

The new study, published on Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change, suggests that unless farmers develop more heat-tolerant corn varieties or gradually move corn production from the United States into Canada, frequent heat waves will cause sharp price spikes. (from the New York Times)

April 23
Disappearance of Arctic sea ice makes commercial fishing viable for the first time; but regulatory and environmental issues emerge. (from the CBC)

April 5
Few things are as bewitching as an English bluebell wood in the spring, with a carpet of shimmering flowers turning the light blue under the trees, and the air laden with scent. But daytrippers hoping for a sight of bluebell woods this Easter may be disappointed, as the drought that brought a hosepipe ban into effect for 20 million people also means bluebells are less abundant than usual. (from the Guardian)

March 15
About 3.7 million Americans live within a few feet of high tide and risk being hit by more frequent coastal flooding in coming decades because of the sea level rise caused by global warming, according to new research. (from the New York Times)

March 11
The UK government is fighting to have nuclear power considered as a renewable form of energy in Europe, in a move that would significantly boost atomic energy in Britain but downgrade investment in renewable generation, according to a leaked document seen by the Guardian.

March 5
A quintessentially Canadian winter tradition – outdoor ice hockey – could be facing extinction within decades because of climate change, a new study says. (from the Guardian)


Feb 28
Canada's northernmost research laboratory is shutting down due to lack of funding.The Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut, will cease year-round operations on April 30. At that time, its equipment will be removed and the building will remain available only for intermittent, short-term projects. (from the CBC)

Feb 28
Although there is widespread agreement on the need for adaptation measures to limit the risks posed by climate change, there is no clear consensus on how much it will cost or how to pay for it . A World Bank report suggests that the price of adaptation in developing countries alone will be $70–100 billion a year between 2010 and 2050, while other studies suggest these figures are too low. (from the Guardian)

Feb 21
Some scientists at an international symposium in Vancouver warn most estimates for a rise in the sea level are too conservative and several B.C. communities will be vulnerable to flooding unless drastic action is taken. (from the CBC)

Feb 21
New figures calculate how much CO2 each country could emit in the future and asks how their fuel reserves affect their position at the UN climate negotiations. (from the Guardian)

Feb 12
Research showing that the Himalayas and nearby peaks have lost no ice in past 10 years has been met with relief and surprise – but scientists warn against jumping to simplistic conclusions. (from the Guardian)

Feb 10
When critics say nuclear power is risky, they often mean the risk of an accident. But people in the nuclear industry say that the bigger threat is natural gas. (from the New York Times)

Jan 31
Research shows northern forests in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba are drying up and shrinking from drought caused by climate change, while the eastern boreal forest is holding its own. (from the CBC)

Jan 26
Climate change this century poses both risks and opportunities, according to the first comprehensive (UK) government assessment of its type. (from the BBC)

Jan 25
Current tropical timber practices are not sustainable and nations should consider the "implications of 'peak timber'", a study has suggested. Are there implications for climate change? (from the BBC)

Jan 24
Bjorn Lomborg's climate sceptic think-tank to close.
The Copenhagen Consensus Centre, directed by the high profile opponent of tackling global warming, is to close in July after the Danish government cut its funding. (from the Guardian)

Jan 18
Moving to a tougher Europe-wide target on greenhouse gas emissions would present the UK with little problem, contrary to what some business lobbyists and think-tanks have been alleging, according to a new analysis of the goals seen by the Guardian. The report concludes that if the EU were to set higher emissions-cutting goals now, by increasing its current target of a 20% cut by 2020 to a 25% or a 30% cut, it would save money in the medium and long term. The saving in fuel costs alone from a 25% cut would be €20bn a year. (from the Guardian)

Jan 13
Prominent M.I.T. researcher Kerry Emanuel has received a "frenzy" of hate-mail after a video featuring an interview with him was published by Climate Desk. (from the Guardian and Mother Jones)

Jan 5
Despite tiny cost, China's biggest airlines will not pay a new European Union tax aimed at cutting carbon emissions, their trade body has said. (from the BBC)

Jan 5
Warming oceans and melting sea ice may have a major impact on harp seals off Canada's Atlantic coast. (from the BBC)

2011


Dec 23
To combat the challenges facing global business and the environment, we need innovative thinking, strategic government and long term investors, says John Sauven in the Guardian.

Dec 22
n public, Canada's environment minister says tar sands are "sustainable", in private the government says there is no "credible scientific information" to support this. (from the Guardian)

Dec 17
The thawing of permafrost promises a rapid release of carbon dioxide and methane.  Methane is especially potent at trapping the sun’s heat, and the potential for large new methane emissions in the Arctic is one of the biggest wild cards in climate science. (from the New York Times).



Dec 17
The intensity of tar sands carbon emissions — the amount of greenhouse gases created per every barrel of oil produced — increased by two per cent between 2009 and 2010, according to an industry report. (from the CBC)

Dec 13
China calls Canada's decision 'preposterous', while Greenpeace says the country is protecting polluters instead of people. "I regret Canada's withdrawal and am surprised over its timing," said the UN climate chief Christiana Figueres. "Canada has a moral obligation to itself and future generations to lead in the global effort." (from the Guardian)

Dec 11
Canada is formally withdrawing from the Kyoto accord, Environment Minister Peter Kent said the decision to do so will save the government an estimated $14 billion in penalties, Kent said. The Conservative government says it has no choice given the economic situation (from the CBC). See also the New York Times and the Guardian.

Dec 11
The outcome of the UN climate change conference in Durban shows how difficult it is going to be to reach any meaningful agreement on tackling by far the most challenging problem that the world faces in the years and decades ahead (from the Irish Times).

Dec 10
Talks to strike a historic new global climate deal were continuing on Sunday night, but it looked increasingly uncertain that the 194 countries would produce a deal in the final few hours (from the Guardian).

Dec 10
What really is at play in Durban are politics on the broadest scale, the relations among Europe, the United States, Canada, Japan and three rapidly rising economic powers, China, India and Brazil. Those international relations, in turn, are driven by each country’s domestic politics and the strains the global financial crisis has put on all of them (from the New York Times).

Dec 9
Canada's Environment Minister says countries shouldn't rush into a second chapter of Kyoto because they are worried about a vacuum in global efforts to control greenhouse gases (from the CBC).

Dec 8
After a day of unexpected drama at the UN climate change talks, a historic deal on greenhouse gases looked tantalisingly within reach on Thursday night – but with a handful of major economies holding out, the end result could still be discord and the death of the Kyoto protocol (from the Guardian).

Dec 8
A new report appears to add to the mounting evidence that global warming is changing the face of Canada's North. Statistics Canada says the average area covered by sea ice during summer has declined in all nine of Canada's northern sea-ice regions over the past four decades (from the CBC).

Dec 7
Low profile in Durban relegates Canada to margins of climate debate. Canada. While other countries have set up pavilions and exhibitions in Durban to promote their climate policies, Canada is missing in action (from the Globe and Mail).

Dec 7
Canadian Environment Minister Peter Kent’s opening address on Wednesday at the UN climate change conference in Durban, South Africa, in which he affirmed that Canada would not make a second commitment to the Kyoto Protocol, was disrupted by protesters (from the CBC).

Dec 4
Canada labeled a 'delayer country.' The goal of holding global warming to 2C will be missed if the world's largest economies insist on delaying negotiations (from the Guardian).

Nov 30
Europe is taking the toughest negotiating stand it has ever adopted on global warming. At this week's UN climate talks in Durban, the bloc will depart from decades of "dovish" practice by insisting stiff conditions must be met by China and other developing countries if a global climate treaty is to be arranged (from the Guardian).

Nov 30
Climate censorship? The BBC has dropped the climate change episode from its wildlife series Frozen Planet to help the show sell abroad. British viewers will see seven episodes, the last of which addresses global warming and the threat to the natural world posed by humans.However, viewers in other countries, including the US, will only see six episodes (from the Telegraph).

Nov 29
Confusion reigns. Canada's Environment Minister Peter Kent would not confirm or deny Monday that Canada plans to formally withdraw from the Kyoto Protocol, as talks on the accord's future got underway in Durban, South Africa (from CBC).

Nov 28
The UN's top climate official said Sunday she expects governments to make a long-delayed decision on whether industrial countries should make further commitments to reduce emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases (from the CBC).

Nov 21

Rich nations 'give up' on new climate treaty until 2020. Just ahead of critical talks and despite pledge for new treaty by 2012, biggest economies privately admit likelihood of long delay (from the Guardian).

Nov 18
Extreme weather will strike as climate change takes hold, IPCC warns  Heavier rainfall, storms and droughts could wipe billions off economies and destroy lives, says report by 220 scientists (from the Guardian).

Nov 13
Weather in Scandinavia is milder.A warmer fall and likely a warm winter may herald things to come (from Svenska Dagbladet, in Swedish).

Nov 12
Under Canada's Species at Risk Act the polar bear has been formally declared a "species of special concern," further driving a wedge between southern Canadians and many resource-dependent northerners (from the CBC, first posted Nov 10).

Nov 10

Cuts to environmental programmes and monitoring in Canada receive international attention.

Nov 9
World headed for irreversible climate change in five years, IEA warns. If fossil fuel infrastructure is not rapidly changed, the world will 'lose for ever' the chance to avoid dangerous climate change (from the Guardian).

Nov 8
The CBC reports that Canada expects to face international pressure at upcoming climate change talks over its refusal to sign on for a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. The Environment Minister also announced how CA$148.8 million in adaptation funding would be distributed. It is unclear if this will address previous staff cuts.

Nov 7
A recent report from Canada's National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) frames climate change in terms of cost and impacts..The NRTEE report  Paying the Price: The Economic Impacts of Climate Change for Canada is the first in-depth exploration of what climate change will cost Canadians, and the cost are overwhelming.

Nov 6
In the New York Times Sunday Review, Brian McFadden's comic strip takes a humorous look at climate change denial.

Also in the New York Times (Nov 6), Andrew Ross' Op-Ed notes that the struggle to slow global warming will be won or lost in cities, which emit 80 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases.  But if policy makers end up focusing only on those who can afford low-carbon technologies associated the movement for sustainability may end up exacerbating rather than ameliorating climate change.

Nov 4
As the New York Times reports,
two new peer-reviewed studies, one about forests and the other about oceans, predict that existing ecosystems will rearrange themselves over the next 70-plus years in response to climate change.

Nov 1
Severe weather is worsening according to a final draft of a report from the IPCC UN climate panel. The report  warns that weather extremes will come at a huge cost (from the Guardian)

News postings are kept for 2 months only on this page. To see older news links visit the archives page

Nov 30
Europe is taking the toughest negotiating stand it has ever adopted on global warming. At this week's UN climate talks in Durban, the bloc will depart from decades of "dovish" practice by insisting stiff conditions must be met by China and other developing countries if a global climate treaty is to be arranged (from the Guardian).

Nov 30
Climate censorship? The BBC has dropped the climate change episode from its wildlife series Frozen Planet to help the show sell abroad. British viewers will see seven episodes, the last of which addresses global warming and the threat to the natural world posed by humans.However, viewers in other countries, including the US, will only see six episodes (from the Telegraph).

Nov 29
Confusion reigns. Canada's Environment Minister Peter Kent would not confirm or deny Monday that Canada plans to formally withdraw from the Kyoto Protocol, as talks on the accord's future got underway in Durban, South Africa (from CBC).

Nov 28
The UN's top climate official said Sunday she expects governments to make a long-delayed decision on whether industrial countries should make further commitments to reduce emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases (from the CBC).

Nov 21

Rich nations 'give up' on new climate treaty until 2020. Just ahead of critical talks and despite pledge for new treaty by 2012, biggest economies privately admit likelihood of long delay (from the Guardian).

Nov 18
Extreme weather will strike as climate change takes hold, IPCC warns  Heavier rainfall, storms and droughts could wipe billions off economies and destroy lives, says report by 220 scientists (from the Guardian).

Nov 13
Weather in Scandinavia is milder.A warmer fall and likely a warm winter may herald things to come (from Svenska Dagbladet, in Swedish).

Nov 12
Under Canada's Species at Risk Act the polar bear has been formally declared a "species of special concern," further driving a wedge between southern Canadians and many resource-dependent northerners (from the CBC, first posted Nov 10).

Nov 10

Cuts to environmental programmes and monitoring in Canada receive international attention.

Nov 9
World headed for irreversible climate change in five years, IEA warns. If fossil fuel infrastructure is not rapidly changed, the world will 'lose for ever' the chance to avoid dangerous climate change (from the Guardian).

Nov 8
The CBC reports that Canada expects to face international pressure at upcoming climate change talks over its refusal to sign on for a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. The Environment Minister also announced how CA$148.8 million in adaptation funding would be distributed. It is unclear if this will address previous staff cuts.

Nov 7
A recent report from Canada's National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) frames climate change in terms of cost and impacts..The NRTEE report  Paying the Price: The Economic Impacts of Climate Change for Canada is the first in-depth exploration of what climate change will cost Canadians, and the cost are overwhelming.

Nov 6
In the New York Times Sunday Review, Brian McFadden's comic strip takes a humorous look at climate change denial.

Also in the New York Times (Nov 6), Andrew Ross' Op-Ed notes that the struggle to slow global warming will be won or lost in cities, which emit 80 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases.  But if policy makers end up focusing only on those who can afford low-carbon technologies associated the movement for sustainability may end up exacerbating rather than ameliorating climate change.

Nov 4
As the New York Times reports,
two new peer-reviewed studies, one about forests and the other about oceans, predict that existing ecosystems will rearrange themselves over the next 70-plus years in response to climate change.

Nov 1
Severe weather is worsening according to a final draft of a report from the IPCC UN climate panel. The report  warns that weather extremes will come at a huge cost (from the Guardian)

Oct 10th and 29thThe Adaptation Economy? The Guardian reports that climate change is not factored into companies' value, warns UN. Carbon finance experts are told firms with high-carbon emissions must be re-evaluated by stock markets

Climate change and adaptation are central themes at the 2012 Planet Under Pressure Conference (London, UK, March 26 to 29)

Oct 20, 2011
Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature study releases findings that show reliable evidence of a rise in average world land temperature.

Oct 15, 2011
Analysis article in the New York Times examines the unique qualities of the climate change debate in the US.

Oct 7, 2011
In Europe climate change is feared more than financial turmoil.

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